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Saturday 10 December December 5, 2016

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We’ll be at Fargo Village Winter Market, Far Gosford Street, Coventry, CV1 5ED. Amazing range of independent businesses you won’t find on high streets. just right for gifts you won’t find anywhere else. With our range of fibre and yarns, hand-dyed & one-off hand-mades from £2.50 to £150,  we’ll be a good fit. Hope we have room to do some demo spinning too. Follow the link, then come and find us between 11am and 6pm.

 

 

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Leicestershire Show, Saturday 27 August 2016 August 25, 2016

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We’re spinning, show-n-telling, & selling  our handspun, hand-dyed, hand-made textiles at the show. New showground – details here. Prices from £2.50 to £165 or thereabouts. Always happy to talk about what we’re doing, how items are made.

To Cotesbach Woolly Market on Saturday 6 August August 4, 2016

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We’re going spinning & hopefully selling at  Cotesbach Educational Trust as part of their Wool Week. cotesbach

Spinning, Sheep, & Wool on the Fourth of July July 3, 2016

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I’m giving one of my talks at  Stoke Library, Coventry tomorrow 4th July at 11 am.

Stoke Library, Kingsway, Coventry CV2 4EA

wholefleeceleicspinners2

 

Spinning for Open Farm Sunday June 3, 2016

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No, Open farm Sunday is not just something invented for The Archers. I’ll be at Whetstone Pastures Farm with the Ewe-to-You ladies & our spinning wheels & items for sale. That’s this Sunday, 5th June. I’ve picked out some mule fleece, dyed with madder – very medieval. So, when is a mule a ewe? Come & ask.

Yarn cakes February 18, 2016

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just spent an evening with my Christmas swift & wool winder. The lilac/pink blue yarn cake is laceweight yarn, hand-dyed. The cream is alpaca plied with superwash wool. The barber-pole set are from another Christmas gift – fleece from a White Faced Woodland sheep, crossed with a blue Texcel. Probably going to be a wrap. Thanks, Sarah

 

 

Successes February 1, 2015

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Just had one of my pieces longlisted in a competition in online magazine Brilliant Flash Fiction. Always satisfying to see work published.

So now, I have several pieces in both Bulkington Writers Anthologies, on Amazon in both Kindle & paperback; a piece in Thynks Publication’s Christmas Celebrations available from this author, if you’re Christmas shopping early.

Indigo Dreams publishers were pleased to accept a piece in one of last year’s quarterly  Dawntreader magazines. Over the next few weeks, I’ll be looking at submitting to opportunities as different as  Magma Poetry and Nuneaton Festival of Arts, Alongside fine tuning my latest presentation on Spinning, Sheep, & Wool. If I’m not tempted away to the wheel & peg loom too much.

Hay Fields Round Hayfield July 6, 2013

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23/6/13:  the day is starting late in the Kinder River valley: low cloud drifts, lifts, and droops again; rain follows the airstream, trees grown tall searching for more light sway threateningly on roots kept shallow by gritstone bedrock.  Rain bands sweep over: fine and enveloping or hard and heavy, slashing the hay meadows flat.

The High Peak still has some mature hayfields – meadow foxtail, knapweed, yellow rattle, plantains, and vetches all make focus points in the undulant grass seas at this time of year.  Some now lies flattened but uncut, and some cut and mouldering in the rain.  Here and there, some has already been mown and gathered: tram-lined fields show buff, pale and green where farmers are hoping there will be enough summer for regeneration and another cut.

Somehow, the patchy hayfield hillside pattern matches the ewes hereabouts: some shorn, most – because of the late-lasting cold weather – not.  Gobbets of shedding fleece catch the breeze, flying and tumbling and picking up moss until thistles hold them fast.

Meanwhile, the ragged ewes walk on, trails of fleece blowing in their faces, like a vain old man’s comb-over, caught in seabreeze off Blackpool Pier.  Some ewes have moulted a whole flank and a glimpse of scalp-pink skin shows beneath the growing summer coat.

I’ve gathered some of the shed fleece and scoured it in the washing machine.  When we’ve had the best of the summer and indoor pastimes prevail, I’ll have a go at spinning this – either with the spinning wheel we are renovating, or with the drop spindle I’ve been experimenting with here at Farlands.  Small projects call first – I’m currently prototyping some crochet shoulder bags for the new mobile which is too big to fit in a pocket.

I’ve some wool dyes to try but also some lovely dark fleece from a Zwarbles sheep: a Dutch breed with a gold-tipped dark brown/grey coat.  Comes up interestingly tweedy and flecked.  Might even suit (bag-carrying) men.

top whorl spindle

top whorl spindle